Clos Vougeot 2005

Clos Vougeot Bertrand Ambroise 2005

Burgundy, France

Per bottle

£99.50

Per case of 6

£597.00 £567.18

Per case of 12

£1,194.00 £1,074.60

Next day delivery

Standard delivery

Collect in shop

“…notes of walnut liqueur and brine-like as well as stony expressions of minerality. This has a sense of creaminess and a focus of fruit in the finish when compared with many of the overtly structured, brashly-concentrated wines in this year’s collection…”

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Categories: , .
Code:

RBCLVOUB

Bottle Size

75cl

Vintage

2005

ABV

13.00

Closure

Cork

Country

France

Region

Burgundy

Grape

Pinot Noir

“The Ambroise 2005 Clos Vougeot – around 75 cases worth, from a parcel near Grands Echezeaux – smells of black currant and charred meat. To these elements are added notes of walnut liqueur and brine-like as well as stony expressions of minerality. This has a sense of creaminess and a focus of fruit in the finish when compared with many of the overtly structured, brashly-concentrated wines in this year’s collection, but there is still a certain smoky, pungent severity here. Nor is this any less powerful than other of those wines. I would look to cellar it for at least 8-10 years. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of ‘perfect berries, solid and well-structured’ from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves.” 92-93 points, Robert Parker